canopic jar in the form of a baboon

Egyptian

Currently on View in K312.c1
Image Licensing

Canopic jars were used to preserve the internal organs of the deceased and were buried with the mummy. They always come in groups of four, with each animal meant to hold a specific organ.

Jars in the form of a baboon (Hapi) held the lungs. Hapi is associated with Nepthys, who was a protector and guardian goddess and helped her sister, Isis, reassemble the parts of Osiris's body after he was murdered and thrown into the Nile.

Egyptian and Near Eastern Art

Canopic jars were used to preserve the internal organs of the deceased and were buried with the mummy. They always come in groups of four, with each animal meant to hold a specific organ.

Jars in the form of a baboon (Hapi) held the lungs. Hapi is associated with Nephthys, who was a protector and guardian goddess and helped her sister, Isis, reassemble the parts of Osiris’s body after he was murdered and thrown into the Nile.

Object Information

culture
Egyptian
creation date
664-332 B.C.
materials
limestone
dimensions
H: 11 in.
accession number
28.245
credit line
Emma Harter Sweetser Fund
copyright
Public Domain
collection
Ancient Art of the Mediterranean
colors

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