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Hakoōmaru Meets Kudō Suketsune

Utagawa Kuniyoshi (Japanese, 1797-1861)


箱王丸と工藤祐経の図

Center panel of tryptich

At the age of thirteen, Gorō Tokimune (called Hakoō as a child) first met his father’s cousin, and murderer, Kudō Suketsune. Kudō had accompanied the shogun Minamoto Yoritomo to worship at the shrine where Hakoō had been sent to become a priest. Wishing to avenge his father’s murder, Hakoō looked for a chance to get close enough to Kudō. The wily Kudō boldly had the boy brought to him. He falsely treated Hakoō with tenderness, speaking as a concerned relative, and even presented the youth with a dagger. But as shown here, all the while Kudō was on his guard, eyeing the boy warily. Kudō departed unharmed with the shogun’s entourage the following morning. Six years later, however, in a famous vendetta, Hakoō and his brother were able to slay Kudō, using the same dagger he had received as a present.

Mrs. Jeanne Gass Stump; given to the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2001.

Object Information

artist
Utagawa Kuniyoshi (Japanese, 1797-1861)
period
Edo
creation date
1843-1845
materials
color woodblock print
dimensions
14 1/4 x 9 5/8 in.
mark descriptions
signed: Ichiyusai Kuniyoshi ga
accession number
2001.310
credit line
Gift of Mrs. Jeanne Gass Stump
copyright
Public Domain
collection
Prints, Drawings, and Photographs
colors