pair of child's moccasins
pair of child's moccasins
pair of child's moccasins
pair of child's moccasins
pair of child's moccasins
pair of child's moccasins
pair of child's moccasins
pair of child's moccasins

pair of child's moccasins

Northeastern Woodlands people

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The word most often used to identify American Indian footwear is "moccasins," a term of the Algonquin people of eastern Canada.

These moccasins are typical in having hard rawhide soles and soft leather upper parts.

The intention of beaded dress items is to beautify and enhance an owner's status.

American Indian beadwork, in general, is decorative rather than symbolic, and most designs are geometric and floral.

Estate of Vice Admiral A. P. Niblack [1859-1929], Indianapolis, Indiana; given to the John Herron Art Institute, now the Indianapolis Museum of Art, in 1930.

Object Information

culture
Northeastern Woodlands people
creation date
1880-1910
materials
hide, sinew, glass beads, ribbon
dimensions
A) 1-1/2 x 3 x 6-7/8 in.
B) 2 x 3-1/2 x 6-3/4 in.
accession number
30.560A-B
credit line
Gift of Vice Admiral Albert Parker Niblack
copyright
Public Domain
collection
Textile and Fashion Arts
colors

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